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Dingo - Australia's Wild Dog

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Australian Dingo

Australian Dingo

Photo Courtesy of Micheal Schubert
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

History
A true primitive breed, and still in it's wild state, the Dingo is one of Australia's unique features.

Brought to Australia by primitive man, the Dingo is believed to be the ancestor of all dog breeds. These dogs were kept by some groups of primitive man as an emergency source of food and hunting partners.
The Dingo has never been fully domesticated and is now in danger of extinction from irate farmers who lose sheep to hungry Dingoes.
About the Dingo:
Extremely rare outside of Australia, Dingoes are classified as wildlife and can not be exported from Australia, with the exemption being to and from registered and approved wildlife parks and zoos. Parts of Australia class the Dingo as "vermin" and it is illegal to keep them in these areas.
Dingoes do not make suitable pets unless taken from an extremely young age (before six weeks) and raised with a firm and gentle hand. This is not a dog to be a child's companion, and can never be trusted off-leash. Dingoes are not "yard pets" and should be taken into the home and incorporated into the family "pack".
Obedience training is a necessity and harsh corrective measures will result in undesirable traits. Also a necessity is a large and secured yard, even "pet" Dingoes will readily return the wild given a chance. Their intelligence has allowed them to survive centuries of man's attempted erradication and also gives the Dingo a stubbornness and ability to think for itself, which does not always coincide with an owner's desires.
A lean and muscular dog, the Dingo can withstand hot, arid temperatures, as well as the cooler climates of certain Australian regions. Their fur is thick and insulating against both hot and cold, and comes in a range of colours, from light sandy tan, to reddish, dark brown or black with white markings.
Dingoes do not bark in the wild, but do have a distinctive howl. They will learn to bark if they associate with other, domestic canines. Dingoes prefer to hunt alone or in their family unit, and as with all truly wild dogs, their mating cycle is yearly, rather than the twice-yearly heats like domestic dog breeds.
Favourite Dingo Links:
The Dingo Farm
Dingo Sanctuary
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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